About Anne Winsauer

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Anne Winsauer – Experienced Educator, Artist, and Designer

 

FBC Knoxville ColumnFrom portrait work at Walt Disney World to developing an art curriculum for children on the autism spectrum, my career has covered a wide gamut of art, design, print media and teaching.

In the advertising field, logos were my specialty, and I worked to visually represent a number of businesses. In addition, I worked for two printing companies, gaining a good understanding of copywriting. Later, while working with large-format outdoor illuminated signs, I designed images for easy reading at a distance.

However, it was when I began working in the education field that I found my calling. I learned to use an individual student’s strengths, interests, and skills as the starting point for assisting cognitive development with art.

Drawing of Mastiff PuppyCurrently, I motivate special needs students ages 3 to 23 to learn life skills and grow academically using innovative visual arts methods.

Working with stop-motion animation has been a wonderful means of making connections with the young people, their interests, and the wider world.

This year, with support of the Kennedy Center for the Arts and VSA Tennessee, we encouraged exceptional children and individuals to learn about architecture during an Architecture and Animation Workshop at the Clayton Center for the Arts on the Maryville College campus in Maryville, Tennessee.

What a very rewarding career!

Continuing Education and Certifications Include:

  • 2013 – Vanderbilt Kennedy Center’s TRIAD Training in Communicating with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • 2012 – Tennessee Support and Training for Exceptional Parents (STEP) Transition Institute (training to help young people with disabilities and on the autism spectrum prepare to transition out of a school environment)
  • 2011 – The VSA Institute’s Arts and Inclusive Learning Training
  • 2010 – The Hanen Centre’s More Than Words program (training in speech development for children with ASD)

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